Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Little Bird: Linoleum Block-cut Project

I have sketched the outlines of the birds on a 3x5 linoleum block...  from here... we shall see...   the third little bird gets kind of scrunched, so I may not carve him.   I will decide when i get there... 
PLAN:
Right now, in this stage, I am thinking of carving out the upper area behind the birds   As well as carving out the area beneath the birds.  
For the inner areas of the birds, I might scratch in details and do a little carving 
PAPER PREP:
I am thinking of using hot-press w/c paper to print on.

before a final printing, I will stamp a light outline of the birds where I want them and use masking to keep the area white.

then, i might create with watercolor a sky like area for above the birds and foliage type area for below.  Just in colors, not actual details.

TBC... 
To see another Lino-cut project in progress check my blog: BICYCLES: Linoleum Block Cut Project

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BICYCLES: Linoleum Block-cut Project

BICYCLES: Linoleum Block Cut Project
Products:
3x5 speedball linoleum block
variety of sharp lino cutting tools
pencil to sketch on design
My first lino-project will be bicycles
I have used a 3x5 block and divided it in half and sketched part of a fantasy bike on each half. (i.e. not completely realistic).
bicycles: PART ONE: This first part of the blog will demonstrate the cutting of these first two images into the linoleum. 
bicycles: PART TWO: The next part will demonstrate creating some colorful papers to print it on
bicycles: PART THREE: Finally, I will use my cuts to print.
IMAGES: 
  
I am doing this quickie lino-cut project in a demonstration for my students - thought you might enjoy seeing it here too.  cj

Please view 
Little Bird Lino Cut

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Wednesday, March 26, 2014

motivational - "my art is like a FRANKENSTEIN..whaaaaat??"

my art is like a FRANKENSTEIN..whaaaaat??

I wanted to make a few comments concerning the "Frankenstein stage," as I jokingly call a newly begun artwork, and how it may lead to feelings of defeatism or maybe depression.
In class, I often say not to judge, be critical or embarrassed of an artwork that has just begun its process.

It often holds true that you should not ask for affirmation/validation on an artwork (in or out of class) in this early Frankenstein-stage of progress because its parts are barely mapped out on the substrate with little sense of detail or completeness. It is usually far too early to pass judgment or to ask for praise or affirmation from anyone other than your instructor.

ALL artists, beginning to professional have some part of this Frankenstein stage in their creative progression - However, professional artists have learned to quickly work beyond this stage or have fortified themselves to buffer against premature "constructive criticism"
More experienced artists have practice behind them and can move beyond any negativity or fear of not being able to complete their piece satisfactorily.

The POWER OF SUGGESTION can be positive or negative to an artist: Artists are often quite sensitive about what they have placed on the paper or canvas and for some reason seem to be too ready and willing to put themselves down rather than to see how their work can and will, shine!

EMBRACE YOUR INNER FRANKENSTEIN! Don't let yourself become embarrassed or discouraged in this early stage of creation! It can potentially create a situation where you start artworks and then stop not having developed the confidence to follow it through to completion. Think about how many artwork "starts" you have laying around or have thrown away or ripped up! I imagine each of us can recall one or two of these! lol

Embracing that your artwork has a humble beginning and piecing together the "monster" is an important part of the creative process. You gain valuable experience in continuing to work out the issues in your "Frankenstein" pieces rather than tossing them!

Artists need to stick together with support! Remember, even though society tends to turn EVERYTHING into some type of competition, really, you are not in competition to create artwork exactly like some other artist!!

Helpful Tip:
When you get down on your art, make simple sketches of what you know and can create easily until you feel better! Maybe do some Cyn-Doodling. Tackle new and more difficult projects when you feel better!
Cyn-Doodle Portrait by CJ Rider
Cyn-Doodle Portrait by CJ Rider


The more you paint: the more you want to paint: the more you will progress your skills!

Stay positive! Embrace your Frankenstein!! lol
Happy Arting Around!!

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Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Recommendations - CJ Rider, Instructor

Olivia M July 24, 2013
CJ was very helpful in assisting my daughter with her college portfolio. She was very knowledgable about different products and techniques my daughter could use for her art pieces. CJ was always calm, encouraging, and very flexible working with my daughter's style of drawing. Arranging lessons was very efficient, and CJ was always willing to extend the lesson time if needed. I would highly recommend CJ.

Nancy W July 24, 2013
Excellent instructor; knowledgeable related to all media. And very patient. Class is fun.

Arcelia W July 6, 2013
Cj is an inspirational artist. I have a great time learning from her. I am very grateful for her willingness and patience. Hope I can meet with her again and keep painting.. Thank you

Kristine D June 30, 2013
Recently, I purchased private watercolor lessons for my niece’s 11th birthday from CJ. All of my correspondence with CJ before and after was always prompt and courteous. CJ even geared the lesson toward my niece’s interests and abilities. We held the lesson at my niece’s house. CJ arrived on time, and was prepared with everything needed. She was even flexible enough to stay an extra hour since the lesson was going so splendidly. My niece’s inherit interest and natural talent really flourished with CJ’s instruction and examples. I would highly recommend CJ and look forward to future private lessons with her myself.

ShirLee U June 28, 2013
CJ is the tutor extraordinnaire! Her classes are reasonably priced, she is skilled in multiple mediums, and she offers valuable instruction to both the novice and the experienced artist.

Noreen D June 28, 2013
CJ is a wonderful teacher, an artist with many different media and a talent for helping you grow as an artist. Started out with one lesson (beginner) and will continue as long as I keep growing..

Karol R June 28, 2013
CJ's Budding Artists art classes for kids is a wonderful way for them to learn all kinds of different art techniques, working with all kinds of different media. She has a sunny, positive attitude & my dealings with her have been delightful.

Suzanne M June 27, 2013
Oh my gosh, I can not express enough how professional CJ was and how beautiful the art work she did for me turned out. I get so many compliments on her work and her prices were more then reasonable. You will not be sorry to take lessons or have some art work done by CJ, she was wonderful.

Pat G June 27, 2013
I took classes with her for over a year.. CJ is exceptionally professional, teaching on your level and where you are in your art. Would love to take more classes from her, but we moved to Casa Grande.

Nithya S September 13, 2012
It was real fun painting with CJ. I thoroughly enjoyed it. :)
Reviews
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5/5 stars July 24, 2013


CJ was very helpful in assisting my daughter with her college portfolio. She was very knowledgable about different products and techniques my daughter could use for her art pieces. CJ was always calm, encouraging, and very flexible working with my daughter's style of drawing. Arranging lessons was very efficient, and CJ was always willing to extend the lesson time if needed. I would highly recommend CJ.
Olivia M.
5/5 stars June 30, 2013


Recently, I purchased private watercolor lessons for my niece’s 11th birthday from CJ. All of my correspondence with CJ before and after was always prompt and courteous. CJ even geared the lesson toward my niece’s interests and abilities. We held the lesson at my niece’s house. CJ arrived on time and was prepared with everything we needed. She was even flexible enough to stay an extra hour since the lesson was going so splendidly. My niece’s inherit interest and natural talent really flourished with CJ’s instruction and examples. I would highly recommend CJ and look forward to future private lessons with her myself.
Kristine D.
5/5 stars June 28, 2013

nice and fine
Johnson M.
5/5 stars June 26, 2013


Marcia C.
5/5 stars June 26, 2013


Keld Kofoed H.
5/5 stars June 25, 2013


Ms. Rider is always professional, helpful and informative. She encourages your artistic endeavors which leads to confidence and enthusiasm. You just can't wait to get back to class and see what you'll learn and accomplish next!
Sherry S.
5/5 stars June 25, 2013


Jem M.
5/5 stars June 25, 2013


Cheryl M.
5/5 stars June 25, 2013


Tiana M.
5/5 stars June 25, 2013


A wonderful artist and a very nice person as well.
Diane W.
5/5 stars June 25, 2013


generous with helpful tips and ideas..
Eileen E.
5/5 stars June 25, 2013


Suzy M.
5/5 stars June 25, 2013


Judy H.
5/5 stars June 25, 2013


Kim H.
5/5 stars June 25, 2013


Marcia S.
5/5 stars June 25, 2013


Fabulous!
Kathy K.
Write a review

Shirlee U.
5/5 stars June 26, 2013


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Sunday, November 17, 2013

my Style of painting???



style:
What is it and how to I get some?
As you go beyond the products and the initial mechanics of painting you start running into this seemingly elusive thing called "style"

The word is freely bandied about in the art world when referencing well known artists (past and present). But what is it and how does an artist get it... AND do you want it!

In brief, an artists personal style is the culmination of how an artist handles the subject and paint on their canvas: i.e. brushwork, proportions, perspective, composition and more. All of these things become unique to each artist and the result demonstrates their style of creating a painting.

A developed artists style is as unique as a fingerprint or individual handwriting. Across any subject or medium the artist uses, the paintings can still be recognized as their work. (sans signature ;)

Your style is there from the beginning, but being a novice, it isn't completely developed.

Back in grade school, first you learn your letters then words, then you learn to print, then you learn to write in cursive then you write stories! After you are well practice your writing becomes recognizable as yours. Eventually, you or your teacher can find your handwritten paper in a stack just by seeing the handwriting alone. It becomes identifiable as your work. (You also develop a personal "style" for telling stories, etc.)

Similarly, a painting style will develop in a practicing artist. First you learn the basics (composition, drawing, colors, value, shading, etc) Then you learn to apply them to a variety of subject matter. After you have created a larger body of work, you will see that your work is recognizable from another artists painting of the same subject.

Style is usually recognized in a professional artist after they have painted a larger body of works. It then becomes evident that they were all created by the same "hand" Which is as unique as a persons handwriting.

When I teach, I enjoy having everyone create a painting from the same still life or whatever. The resulting paintings are unique to each artists hand. Their individual styles shine through even though the subject matter is the same. Each person emphasizes the subject matter differently, handles the paint differently, sees color relationships differently, etc. This is part of what creates individual style.

Style can be evident very early on but it usually morphs as an artist becomes more experienced in understanding composition, color theory, paint handling, perception and creation. When a mature or professional artist changes their M.O. from say painting portraits to painting landscapes, their style is still identifiable in the new work.

In the beginning, I recommend picking a genre and sticking to it while you develop your skills. For instance just paint leaves or flowers or landscapes or portraits, etc. If you intend to show in galleries, they like to see a fairly large and consistent body of work. If one of your paintings sells, they want to be sure that you can reproduce the magic and not just be a "one hit wonder".

The more you practice your painting, the more evident your style will become. Don't be surprised if others notice your style before you do!

To start recognizing the "style" of other painters - start with the old masters. google for instance "Monet, landscapes" and then click to see images only.  then open another window and google for instance "DaVinci, landscapes"   

Then google them again with "portraits"  or just their name to see all images.  Do this with many artists - see how each painters body of works has a recognizable aspect to it.   

All words in this blog (in part or whole) are © CJ Rider -  CJ@RiderCreations.com -
Please use complete and proper attributions with linkback if you use my writings or images.  Thankyou




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Saturday, August 24, 2013

Why use QR scans? What the heck are they???


I created a QR code scan to place in my newsletter and in Flyers advertising my workshops.

What is A QR code? (Quick Response Code) It is probably best described in Wikipedia: wikipedia QR_code

In brief, it is a URL within a matrix box that can be scanned by a program on your cell phone to lead you to just about any place or document on the internet!

On my cell phone:
To create and read codes, I downloaded a program called "QRDroid" But there are many selections on the internet - pick the one that sounds the best for you and your phone. Use your program choice to create QRcodes on your phone or on your computer.

If I just want to make a brief statement about my upcoming classes but want the rest of the info available... I will put on the QR that I made for my class ad. If customers are reading the info on their computer, they can scan the QR with their cell and download the pdf with all of my class info, or a list of needed supplies for a workshop, etc. thus avoiding the potential waste of reams of paper!

I put the QR on my Art class/workshop flyers so people can very simply have my class info in their phone.
Go ahead and scan the QR below and see how it works! It is a nice way to get a supply list out to students who drop by the store and forgot it, saves on paper and INK !
cj

PS - Don't forget to give your QR code a title!


Example idea:
I can create a window flyer containing a few brief sentences in bold print with dates about upcoming classes and workshops - then insert the Code for the full page of info.

It is much more convenient to have a PDF on the phone for instant access than to have a stack of paper to keep track of- PLUS- if you find you are not interested, you can just delete it and not carry the guilt of tossing a tree! ;)




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Monday, June 3, 2013

Which Watercolor Paper??

Which watercolor paper?

There are a great deal of watercolor paper manufacturers.  To further compound selecting paper, each manufacturer also puts out a great variety of watercolor paper. So how do you choose?

Rule of thumb for beginning W/C paper selection:

  1. Skip the student grade and select a mid-price of the professional grade w/c papers.
     
  2. If you like fine details pick a hot press paper - for more textured paper, go for cold press and finally for landscapes and lots of paper texture pick rough.
  3. If you can- purchase a tablet containing a sampling of a manufacturers w/c paper

More on w/c paper to come...







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